Skip to main content

About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
CSPAN 5
CNBC 4
KPIX (CBS) 3
CNNW 1
CSPAN2 1
KBCW (CW) 1
MSNBCW 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
. she has 51 of honorary degrees. she has been the first of everything -- the national science foundation. she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at and i.t.. [applause] she is an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she has been called the health czar of america. the point guard over hauling the system. how about that for a job? what a powerhouse right here. so we actually have a lot of brainpower up here. all of you could have done very different things. you had a lot of choices. i would love to hear about how you ended up taking what you did. who wants to start? >> a failed of violinist. i was raised to be a musician. my mother still asks may what happened. i was always interested in politics and writing stories for the paper. it actually was complete serendipity. i was in college and was at a meeting of the naacp. we had some big issues. this was the 1960's and we heard music down the hall. it was the college radio station and i was drawn to it. i pitched in and begin programming classical music. and they needed somebody to help with the news. i
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
and time she was putting into her appearance. >> i want to move to science. it is such a huge thing these days about the lack of women in science. in some universities, only 10% of the teachers are female. what can we do to get more women motivated to go into science and why is it important? >> >> talk about why they are not there first. it begins very early in terms of which women are exposed to, the expectations. it is a lot of hard work. science is a funny business because one is not always in the limelight. that is kind of public affirmation that is not there until one is a fair distance down the road and becomes an instant entrepreneur or something like that. a lot of what happens to women will happen within the community within which they work. a lot of the attitudes get reinforced. i think what needs to happen is we have to try to reach young women early. we have to affirm them. as a society, we have to value science and those who do it more. everything we like to play with, including broadcast media and health care, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological i
with a computer science degree. >> i graduated with my bachelor's in 2009 and my first job was actually at a retail store at the mall. at first it was kind of embarrassing. >> i couldn't get a job in the field i wanted to. so i figured i would go to law school to change to be where i want to be. >> reporter: even with a higher degree it is still tough. he is still in college and worried about his future because his friends have been forced to take jobs they don't even want. >> they settle with retail businesses. even all my friends work at mcdonald's and places like that because of the higher jobs that are hard to get these days. >> reporter: with the low- paying jobs, it will be that much harder. with tuitions rising across the nation, those bills are stacking up. >> one of my friends bar tend and work at the restaurant just to pay off the loan that she got. >> reporter: she has a 4-year- old as she is worried about what kind of a world her daughter will face. >> it is really disstressing. i got out of the school in the early 90s. it's a tough market. >> reporter: with all these colleg
science degree. >> i graduated with my bachelors in 2009 and my first job was at a retail store. at first it was kind of embarrassing. >> i couldn't get a job in the field i wanted to. i figured i have to go to law school to get where i wanted to be. >> reporter: even with a higher degree it is still tough. bill song is still. >> college and he's worried about his future because his friends have been forced to take jobs they don't even want. >> all my friends have a hard time. all of my friends with high degrees working at mcdonalds or some places like that, the higher jobs are harder to get nowadays. >> reporter: with a low paying job it's harder for the college grads to pay back student loans. those bills are stacking up. >> one my friends bar tends and works at a restaurant just trying to pay off the lobes she got. >> reporter: maria has a 4-year- old and she's worried about what kind of world her daughter will face. >> it's really distressing. i got out of school in the early 90s. it was a tough market then, but not the way it is now. >> reporter: with all these college graduates in r
. >> there's science to it. >> there's heavy science and we tell you all about it in the book. >> we know what happens when we eat junk food. we get father, but what happens inside the body? >> a lot of things happen. we eat too much we gain fat and it's toxic. it surrounds our vital organs causes a toxic disease. it's killing us. >> there's two things here what you eat and what you do with your body. what's going on, chris, with our body and what does it take to cement that habit? >> one of the nice things about the book nice guys don't talk about exercise a lot. we talk about it all the time. it's the flywheel of maintenance. it does all kinds of stuff to help you lose weight be healthier, more optimistic or more energetic. we told people it makes a world of sense to work out semi hard six days a week. people go, what? way too scarey. but you have to do it. >> weight's become a bad buzzsquoorks . >> wheat's become a bad buzz world. >> 1% of the americans have celiac disease and they can't have wheat in their diet. i think it's easy for us to say, hey, we can't eat whe
him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain the equity in your home, or even tries to buy a car in your name, lifelock is on guard. and with lifelock's 24/7 alerts, they contact you by text, phone or email as soon as they detect suspicious activity in their network. lifelock wants you to be protected this holiday season, so they're giving you 60 days of protection risk-free. >> my years as a prosecutor taugh
his nose so bright? well, science has an answer. it's red all right. we will share it with you ahead. ♪ rudolph the red nosed reindeer. you'll go down in history. ♪ with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purche, everday! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great sinesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> okay. two and a half minutes left. we've talked a lot about the resilience of the markets even in the face of the fiscal cliff market. maybe the market has been taking this in stride. look what happened today. we almost got to 20, the yellow flag area. we haven't been to 20 on the vix since back in july, early july, and today we're up 3.7% at 1928. however, look at a one--year chart of the dow comparing it to the vix. what often happens is when the vix peaks as it did in june and july, that can mark a bottom in the stock market so we're starting to move up again. i'm just saying. not trying to forecast anything and here's what happened today at the dow, sort of falling off here in the latter part of the hour but not off. off the lows of the day. down 21 points. material stocks were the strength today. up 1.5%. everybody else was either unchanged or lower. what do you make of the increased volatility or increased fear here, david darst, as we go into the end of the year
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> good morning, him ecarol costello. it's 30 minutes past the hour. time to check our top stories. we're 30 seconds away from the start of trading at the new york stock exchange. representatives from the new york national guard are ringing the opening bell today. [ bell ringing ] more than 4,000 guards and airmen helped the victims of superstorm sandy. investors are still concerned about the looming fiscal cliff. >>> blizzard warning in up to six states. in arkansas the national guard has been called to provide ambulance service for residents. heavy snow and strong winds will lead to whiteout conditions across the ohio river valley. the heaviest snow is expected to move into western pennsylvania and new york state this afternoon. >>> hundreds of american families wanting to adopt russian children may have their dreams dashed. they have given final approval for a ban on such adoptions, seen as payback for a recently signed u.s. law imposing travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>>
to understand there is no established science right now to determine whether or not a gene will predispose someone to violent behavior. i mean that's the first thing. this is a very complicated situation. people have genes. they don't always predispose or actually turn into a specific problem. and in this case if someone were to be found to have a gene, and this is a needle in a haystack, it might give some clues as to whether or not someone might or, other people might be predisposed to this kind of crime. heather: this would be a first of a kind study or a first of a kind research to >> again, there have been studies that have been done on violent offenders, and previously and we have gotten some body of evidence that helped us to determine whether this is a problem. where it is more established, where we're doing genetic testing where it is incredibly value in determining predisposing conditions such as taysak's disease or whether someone ends up with sickle cell anemia. whether someone is predisposed to alzheimer's or cancer it gets controversial and this particular probably the most c
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> i'll tell you, it might be the middle of winter, but it's more like the cast of "some like it hot" here at the exchange. it's in french. i'll let you say the actual name of this group. a group of ballet enthusiasts founded in 1974, professional male dancers. everything from ballet to modern dance, classical, original works. it's definitely adding an air of levity to the occasion. in a couple seconds, the opening bell at the nyse. as we said, at the big board, the ballet from monte carlo. performing until january 6th in new york city. and over at the nasdaq, a group that does a lot of good work at this time of the year, the salvation army. >> some like it hot. >> interesting. >> the birth cage. bird cage. >> looking where we are opening, no surprise to the down side here. initially out of the gate, one of their biggest losers is microsoft, down by more than a percent. we were talking about whether or not there will be any upside to pc sales. a lot of the data points indicated by "the new york times"
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> italy's mario monti announcing he would consider seeking a second term as italian prime minister if approached by allies that are committed to actually backing his reforms. michelle caruso-cabrera joins us on set. you can see that andrew was taking some shots. >> a new camera. >> i'm so used to it wherever i go. andrew, we've got the fire behind you. >> it's summer cute. >> the sweater. >> yeah. >> but it's an orange -- i don't understand why it's orange. it's hal weeb. >> it's a red sweater. >> look at it. i know it's coming a little bit orangey. >> on tv. >> okay. >> lovely. thank you. love the guys in the control room. >> so here's italy. silvio berlusconi. your intro was about mario monti which is all true. silvio berlusconi, the former prime minister of italy -- >> my favorite. >> thank goodness for silvio berlusconi. >> look at his hair. what is he, 76? >> 76. he just sat down with cnbc italy over the weekend. silvio berlusconi says he does not want to run for prime minister, but, he is oblig
on polling science them raw emotion from a campaign during battle. there was a sense among republicans that chris christie had stabbed him in the back. what's interesting about these candidates to do the crossover move is they tend to alienate the base and they tend to lose their effectiveness of a party that they cross over to. in recent days, talking to people in the senate you actually feel that his support for the $60 billion request for 70 relief is hurting them with republicans. things move on rather quickly in politics. host: there are lingering peelings that he did not do what romney expected with the keynote address. he said he said that today and a half before and they did not change anything. guest: there's a lot of grumbling when it comes to chris christie. a lot of them felt he cared more about himself than governor romney. he was not a staff favorite, to put it mildly. when the grumbling that took place after the hurricane, he said he understood because he has been a governor and he needs to concentrate on his staff. a lot of them more deeply angry about his embrace. pres
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we are at the top of the hour. hello to you all. welcome to "weekends with alex witt." i'm t.j. holmes in for her today. 1:00 in the east, 10:00 in the west. let me tell you what is happening. we've got three days to go until we go off that cliff, the fiscal cliff. new today one key congressman is giving us a sober status report of where things are. >> i think there is a sense of urgency, t.j., just because of where we are. we're right at the deadline. as a matter of fact, it looks like we will be here on new year's eve and possibly new year's day. they've already alerted us, members of the house, to look at the possible way of doing that. >> at this hour, senate leaders are scrambling to piece together a last-minute deal to avoid middle class tax hikes and possibly delay steep spending cuts. both sides weighing inned to. >> congress can prevent it from happening if they act now. leaders in congress are working on a way to prevent this tax hike on the middle class, i believe we may be ab
's our representative of the disinvestment of humanity, arts in favor of commerce, science, technolog y. but what you just said and the context within need for the untold stories is indicative of the historical literacy that's black history is the subject that is most of known or erased from our collective consciousness. is that where literacy contributes to our future? the larger story is essential to your vision of the country we ought to live then. >> guest: i don't know. i thought about how reflective her family was of the american story. i wanted to to imbue with a history so people could see her family had front-row seats to the most important moments. slavery, a civil war, and emancipation, migration, jim crow, a depression, and all the steps forward and back were reflected of who we are. >> host: did you think of it as a smaller project? not to put it in context the individuals of the family tree but it became a social history of rural and urban urban, a southern and northern sweeping, intimate. did that scale have been as a result of their research with pen to paper and fought
.s. department of agriculture, social science analyst. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having us. >> tomorrow, we will continue looking at fiscal cliff negotiations and how americans will be affected if the deadline passes. our guest will be joseph rosenberg, followed by a look by presidential campaigning and the influence of the electoral college. then a discussion on hurricane sandy relief funding. we will be joined by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journali
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)